Tinker-Muse Prize Award Recipients

2017 - Matthew England (Australia)

For his sustained and seminal insights into the influence of the Southern Ocean on the continent and its role in the global climate system

2016 – Rob DeConto (USA)

For his outstanding work on past and future Antarctic climate and for integrating geological data with modelling showing potential sea level rise from ice sheet melt

2015 - Valérie Masson-Delmotte (France)

For her work on the characterization, quantification and understanding of past changes in climate and water cycle, translating the isotopic data to paleo-temperature records.

2014 - Tim Naish (New Zealand)

For his outstanding research in understanding Antarctica’s response to past and present climate change and the role of Antarctica’s ice sheets in global sea-level change through time

2013 - Martin Siegert (UK)

For his innovative research on Antarctic subglacial lakes and the reconstruction of Antarctic glacial history, support of early-career researchers and public outreach

2012 - Steve Rintoul (Australia)

For his profound contribution to our scientific understanding of the Southern Ocean, advancing coordinated international investigation and long-term Southern Ocean observing systems

2011 - José Xavier (Portugal)

For his outstanding research on the predator-prey dynamics that sustain populations of albatrosses, penguins and other top predators in the Southern Ocean

2010 - Helen Fricker (USA)

For her discovery of active sub-glacial lakes, showing that these lakes form dynamic hydrologic systems, where one lake can drain into another in a short period of time

2009 - Steven Chown (South Africa)

For his outstanding research on invasive species and the effect of climate change and human interactions on Antarctica and for his advice to the Antarctic Treaty System

Many forecasters and futurists tell us that in 2065:

  • the world’s human population will be 8.5 billion,
  • atmospheric CO2 levels will exceed 650 ppm under a business as usual scenario,
  • the Arctic ocean will be ice free in August and September,
  • average global temperature will 4°C warmer than in 2000,
  • ocean pH will be less than 8.2, and
  • sea level will be ~26 cm higher than in 1990.

What will these dramatic changes to Planet Earth mean for the world’s last great wilderness and a bellwether of global change – Antarctica and the Southern Ocean? To speculate about this future world and the ramifications for human societies, the “1st Martha T. Muse Colloquium” will convene a panel of the Martha Muse Prize Awardees and Guests to address the topic “Beyond the Horizon – Antarctica and the Southern Ocean 2065” in Queenstown, New Zealand on Tuesday, April 22, 2014. The Colloquium is part of the “1st SCAR Antarctic and Southern Ocean Horizon Scan” that is assembling ~80 of the world’s leading Antarctic scientists, policymakers, and logistics science funders to develop a collective community view of the most timely, urgent and compelling scientific questions that need to be addressed in the next two decades.

The Colloquium panel will include Martha T. Muse Prize Fellows Steven Chown (terrestrial ecologist and policy adviser), Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Helen Fricker (glaciologist and satellite observational specialist), University of California, San Diego, USA; José Xavier (marine biologist ecologist and marine mammals expert), University of Coimbra and the British Antarctic Survey, Portugal/UK; Steve Rintoul, (physical oceanographic modeller and observationalist) CSIRO, Australia; and Martin Siegert (glaciologist and geologist), University of Bristol, UK. The Muse Fellows will be joined on the panel by Neil Gilbert (policy adviser and Antarctic governance expert), Antarctica New Zealand, and Gary Wilson (marine geologist and geophysicist and paleoclimate expert), Director of the New Zealand Antarctic Research Institute (NZARI). The panel will be moderated by a public New Zealand personality or popular news scientist to be named. The Muse Colloquium will be made widely available via the web, details to follow.